Gordon Ewy MD: "We're about at the tipping point."

Dr. Gordon Ewy from the University of Arizona is probably the World’s leading advocate for “cardiocerebral resuscitation” (as opposed to cardiopulmonary resuscitation). In other words, continuous chest compressions.

The American Heart Association stopped short of advocating continuous chest compressions for professional rescuers in 2005, but Dr. Ewy thinks we may finally be at the “tipping point.”

Click HERE to see the report on KOLD-TV News 13 from Tuscon, AZ.

I just love this quote from the Arizona Republic.

“It’s OK to be cantankerous and opinionated if you’re right,” he says. “And we’re right.”

See also:


Tucson doctor a crusader for CPR change

Doctor pushes for compression-only CPR

4 Comments

  • Timothy Clemans says:

    There doesn't seem to me to be anything significant about CCR other than don't transport dead people and delay intubation and ventilation until after 3 cycles of chest comprehensions/defibrillation. Much of the "life-saving" aspects of CCR are already apart of the 2005 AHA guidelines.

  • Tom B says:

    Timothy -Don't you see a difference between 30:2 and continuous chest compressions? Having looked at the literature with an open mind, I find the difference to be significant. When you stop compressions for whatever reason there is a significant drop in coronary and cerebral perfusion pressure.I personally like the Wake County approach of capturing the airway with a King LT-D, applying a ResQPOD, and delivering asynchronous ventilations without interrupting chest compressions.Tom

  • Timothy Clemans says:

    "Don't you see a difference between 30:2 and continuous chest compressions? Having looked at the literature with an open mind, I find the difference to be significant."The Arizona and Wisconsin CCR studies published in 2008 (here and here) did not compare 30:2 to CCC. They compared 15:2, 1 minute of CPR, stacked shocks, post-stock analyzes, and post-stock pulse checks to delayed intubation, NRB O2 until intubation, 2 minutes of CCC, and 1 shock per cycle. Rock and Walworth counties, Wisconsin's survival to hospital discharge rates for witnessed VF before (2001 – 2003) and after (2004 – 2006) were 20% (18/92) and 47% (42/89) respectively. 5% vs. 18% in the Arizona studies. I do agree the differences in the before and after witnessed VF survival to hospital discharge rates are significant. However I doubt changing from 30:2 to CCC will increase survival rates significantly.

  • Tom B says:

    Timothy – It's an animal model, but check the graph in Figure 3. When correlated with the other studies it seems persuasive to me! Tom

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